Keratometer

A keratometer, also known as an ophthalmometer, is a diagnostic instrument for measuring the curvature of the anterior surface of the cornea, particularly for assessing the extent and axis of astigmatism. It was invented by the Germanphysiologist Hermann von Helmholtz in 1851, although an earlier model was developed in 1796 by Jesse Ramsden andEverard Home.

 

A keratometer uses the relationship between object size (O), image size (I), the distance between the reflective surface and the object (d), and the radius of the reflective surface (R). If three of these variables are known (or fixed), the fourth can be calculated using the formula {\displaystyle R=2d{\frac {I}{O}}}. There are two distinct variants of determining R; Javal-Schiotz type keratometers have a fixed image size and are typically ‘two position’, whereas Bausch and Lomb type keratometers have a fixed object size and are usually ‘one position’.